Compass
  • Our Agents
  • Buy
  • Sell
  • Rent
  • New Developments
  • WELCOME TO IRVINGTON
    Once one of the richest towns in the country, Irvington has been home to several well-to-do, like Louis Comfort Tiffany (the famous glassmaker), Madam C.J. Walker (the first African-American millionaire), and John Jacob Astor III (patriarch of the British line of the family). Just about 20 miles from New York City, and hugging the Hudson River, this verdant village is known for its lovingly preserved 19th-century architecture and natural landscapes.
    Neighborhood Tags
    • PRICEY
    • MANSIONS
    • FARMERS MARKET
    • RESTAURANTS
    • SMALL
    • QUIET
    • HISTORIC
    WHAT TO EXPECT
    Inspiring views, stellar schools, sprawling estates.
    THE LIFESTYLE
    Quiet and quaint.
    UNEXPECTED APPEAL
    A wealth of diverse—and critically-acclaimed—dining options.
    THE MARKET
    Victorians, colonials, carriage houses, multimillion-dollar mansions.
    YOU'LL FALL IN LOVE WITH
    The streets steeped in history.
     
    NEIGHBORHOOD TAGS
    • PRICEY
    • MANSIONS
    • FARMERS MARKET
    • RESTAURANTS
    • SMALL
    • QUIET
    • HISTORIC
    LOCATED IN WESTCHESTER COUNTY, NY
    Commute Times
    Grand Central 41m. by train, 38m. by car
    LGA 32m. by car
    AROUND THE BLOCK
    IRVINGTON
    A piece of living history on the Hudson.
    The name of this charming Westchester Hudson River town was changed in 1854 from Dearman Town to Irvington in honor of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow author Washington Irving, whose early 1800s Gothic revival home sits just outside its borders. In the years since, the village has boomed, but that nineteenth century character remains.
    WHAT TO EXPECT:
    Inspiring views, stellar schools, sprawling estates.
    About one-third of the 2.8-square-mile village is undeveloped. The residential lots are larger than you’ll find in Westchester’s other Hudson River towns, and many of them come with stunning vistas. Even the campus of the high school and middle school—consistently ranked among the best in the state—sits atop a winding road on the site of a former castle.
    THE LIFESTYLE:
    Quiet and quaint.
    No strip malls or even supermarkets here. Irvington’s charm is best experienced by strolling its parks, especially Matthiessen on the Hudson, and picturesque Main Street. Those looking for nighttime entertainment can enjoy the occasional film or concert at the Town Hall Theater, built in 1902 and patterned after Washington D.C.’s Ford Theater.
    UNEXPECTED APPEAL:
    A wealth of diverse—and critically acclaimed—dining options.
    The village is home to just 6,500, but the town’s food scene pulls patrons from miles away. Downtown you’ll find five-star options for Cantonese, Northern Indian, Korean, Greek, Malaysian—even Texan.
    THE MARKET:
    Victorians, colonials, carriage houses, multimillion-dollar mansions.
    While there are a few smaller and more modern homes sprinkled about, Irvington is best for buyers who want a little history and a lot of land. Late 19th-century colonials and rowhouses dot the downtown streets, and the sweeping estates lie closer to the outskirts of town.
    YOU'LL FALL IN LOVE WITH:
    The streets steeped in history.
    More than 200 buildings in the Main Street area were built between 1850 and 1930, and the locals are serious about preserving them. A couple dozen downtown streets are on the National Register of Historic Places.